RESOURCES FOR WOMEN JOURNALISTS

 The media is not truly free and representative without the equal voice of women. Through our programs we empower women journalists with the training, opportunities, and support to become leaders in the news industry.  


Women journalists often face unique challenges while doing their jobs.  International Nepali Journalists Association -INJA has gathered resources to help our female colleagues around the world find networks, resources and tools to handle issues such as online harassment, workplace discrimination and gender-based violence, as well as easily locate opportunities and support designed specifically for women journalists.


International Networks

Professional networks can be great resources for peer support, mentorship, collaboration and contacts. In the male-dominated industry of investigative journalism, it can be helpful to reach out to other women for understanding and support. That’s why we’ve rounded up a list of regional and global networks specifically for women journalists around the world.


Launched in 2017, the Coalition for Women in Journalism aims to foster “camaraderie between women journalists around the globe,” offering resources, events, advocacy and mentoring from experienced female journalists. The Coalition has contacts in countries across Latin America and Asia.


The Washington-based International Women’s Media Foundation was founded in 1990 and today provides grants and training, offers several awards and organizes reporting trips for women journalists from all over the world, with a focus on under-reported stories. The IWMF also has an Emergency Fund and supports safety training — information that can be located in the “Safety” section below.


The International Association of Women in Radio & Television is a global network for women working in broadcast and electronic media, with chapters in Afghanistan, Cameroon, Iraq-Kurdistan, Moldova, Norway, South Africa, Uganda, Cambodia, India, Kenya, Nepal, the Philippines, Tanzania and the United States. The IAWRT supports global projects focused on women and media, organizes conferences and offers professional skills training opportunities.


Media Moms is a closed Facebook group with over 500 members who are journalist moms, as well as moms working in newsrooms, in journalism education and on the business side of media. Its mission statement: “We face unique challenges balancing deadlines and life at home. This is a supportive space to share stories, issues, solutions and virtual hugs.”


Networks in Africa 

Launched by Code for Africa, WanaData is a network of female African journalists, data scientists and techies collaborating to produce data-driven stories. Find stories and conversations on Twitter using #Wanadata. Join the team or pitch a story here. Together with its partners, the network offers a digital journalism training program


Founded in 2016, the African Women in the Media convenes annually, runs an active Facebook group and has a weekly newsletter focusing on professional development of African women in the industry and representation of gender issues in the media.

Established in 1983, the Association of Media Women in Kenya is a nonprofit membership organization focused on equality and visibility for women in the industry and in society through media. AMWIK publishes resources, including the Women Journalist’s Digital Security survey, and offers a scholarship fund.


The Nigeria Association of Women Journalists was established 25 years ago and aims to increase women’s access and leadership in the media. NAWOJ offers advocacy and training to women journalists in Nigeria.


Cameroon Media Women launched as a WhatsApp group and a closed Facebook page in 2018 in response to the #MeToo movement. With the #StopSexualHarassment237 hashtag, referring to Cameroon’s country code, women journalists held a Twitter discussion and shared videos discussing the issues women face in newsrooms.


The Senegal-based Inter-African Network for Women, Media, Gender Equity and Development is a media and communications organization for women founded in 2001 and operating in 22 countries in West and Central Africa. FAMEDEV is dedicated to media, gender equity and development in Africa. It provides training to female journalists; produces resource kits for advocacy, information and training; and promotes social entrepreneurship.


Networks in Latin America 

Launched in 2013, Chicas Poderosas has chapters in 13 countries in Latin America and Spain. It organizes investigative journalism workshops and hackathons; trains women in leadership, digital and new media skills; and has facilitated mentoring and fellowships. The organization’s New Ventures Lab provides guidance and funding for women-led independent media ventures. 


Launched in 2017, the Coalition for Women in Journalism aims to foster “camaraderie between women journalists around the globe,” offering resources, events, advocacy and mentoring from experienced female journalists. The Coalition has a chapter in Mexico.


Networks in the Middle East

Established in 1999, the Arab Women Media Center is an Amman-based NGO that focuses on job training, skill development and media literacy – for women and youth. AWMC produces documentary films and resources focused on women and the media, and has an online network to connect women journalists in the region.


Based in the Netherlands, the Syrian Female Journalists Network was founded in 2012 with a mission to amplify the voices of female journalists in Syria and help them get into positions of leadership. SFJN, which has both male and female members, provides training for female journalists inside Syria, as well as in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan, focusing on gender and feminism. The network shares resources and opportunities with its members.


Networks in North America

Started in 1985, the Journalism & Women Symposium aims to provide a community for women journalists in the United States, with an active national listserv, regional chapters and networking and training events. JAWS focuses on providing “resources, support, training and information about issues that affect women” in the media. JAWS hosts an annual Conference and Mentorship Program and also offers ongoing mentoring


The Washington-based International Women’s Media Foundation was founded in 1990 and today provides grants, training and reporting trips to women journalists from all over the world, with a focus on under-reported stories. The IWMF also has an Emergency Fund and supports safety training — information that can be located in the “Safety” section below. 


Started in 1909, the United States-focused Association for Women in Communications works to elevate the role of women in communications through learning opportunities, a jobs board and connections across a network of women leaders.


Networks in Asia

The Network of Women in Media, India is an advocacy and networking organization that provides a forum for women journalists in India to “share information and resources, exchange ideas, promote media awareness and ethics, and work for gender equality and justice” within the industry and society. NWMI has 16 chapters across the country. 


Working Women Journalists in Nepal is an advocacy organization that lobbies for increased access and equal opportunity for women in the media, and provides trainings, seminars and workshops.


The NüVoices network supports women working on the subject of China (broadly defined), including journalists. NüVoices has a closed Facebook page, chapters in Greater China, the United States and Europe; and a directory of female experts. 


Launched in 2017, the Coalition for Women in Journalism aims to foster “camaraderie between women journalists around the globe,” offering resources, events, advocacy and mentoring from experienced female journalists. The Coalition has chapters in Afghanistan, Pakistan, China and India.


Women in Media Network Japan was formed in 2018 by 86 women journalists, growing out of the #WithYou movement against sexual harassment.


Networks in Europe

In the United Kingdom, a group of female journalists created The Second Source in 2017 as an alternative professional network for women, as well as to tackle harassment in the media. The organization aims to promote awareness, inform women of their rights and create change in the industry. In 2018, The Second Source launched a mentorship program “aimed at women who are starting out as professional journalists, who are considering dropping out of the industry or who feel like they need more direction.” It’s intended to provide not only career advice but also advice for dealing with work-related challenges.


The London-based Women in Journalism is a professional network of women in the media in the United Kingdom. WIJ hosts seminars and panels, conducts research, facilitates networking events and has a mentoring program for both emerging and established women journalists. 


In France, Prenons la une is an association of women journalists advocating for fair representation of women in the media and professional equality in newsrooms. The network meets every few months, and provides support to women facing discrimination and harassment.


In Germany, Journalistinnenbund is a nationwide, cross-generational network of over 400 women working in journalism. The organization, which was founded in 1987, has regional groups around the country and a mentoring program for emerging journalists.

Chicas Poderosas Spain was launched in 2018 with conference attended by 155 people. This is a spin-off on a Latin American group. Its Twitter handle: @PoderosasES.


Safety Resources

Safety is something all journalists worry about, but women face additional threats with gender-based violence, harassment, discrimination in the newsroom and in the field, and disproportionate online attacks. Below are some resources to improve security for women in the industry. 


The International Association of Women in Radio & Television published a Safety Handbook for Women Journalists. This is a 95-page guide aimed at female reporters in conflict zones and includes sections on risk assessment, online harassment and travel safety.

The International Women’s Media Foundation has set up an Emergency Fund to assist women journalists with legal and medical bills, as well as relocation costs. 


GIJN has compiled a general resource page of safety guides and organizations that provide aid to journalists in danger. Assistance ranges from medical and legal aid to moving the journalist out of the country where their safety is threatened. 


The European Centre for Press & Media Freedom has launched an alarm center where female journalists can report attacks via encrypted messaging and seek help. The messages will be opened by female staff at ECPMF and the reports kept confidential.


The International Federation of Journalists is working with the International Labour Organisation on a campaign to stop violence against women journalists. Resources include toolkits, publications and links to relevant policies. The IFJ provides support and resources to directly address problems and to pressure local governments for meaningful change.


We now know that self-care can be as important for safety and well-being as security measures. To minimize burnout, mitigate trauma and boost your focus, check out these yoga videos from the IWMF for morning and evening practice, designed specifically for women journalists.


Troll-Busters.com is a global campaign that offers “online pest control for journalists,” focusing on women and specializing in identification, mitigation and reporting of online threats and harassment. They also have resources and training specific to women journalists. 


PEN America recently released an Online Harassment Field Manual with practical tools and tactics to defend against online hate and harassment. PEN describes the manual as “a one-stop shop of advice, guidance and resources on cyber-stalking, doxing, hateful speech and other forms of digital harassment.” In addition to universal advice on “what to do,” the resource includes information on relevant US state laws.


The Byte Back campaign was launched in 2016 by the International Federation of Journalists and partner organizations in the Asia Pacific region to stop cyber-bullying and online harassment of women journalists. The campaign provides resources, tactics and support to combat online harassment and trolling.


Access Now’s Digital Security Helpline works with individuals and organizations around the world, free of charge. They can help improve digital security practices and provide rapid-response emergency assistance within two hours in English, Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, Tagalog, Arabic and Italian.


Alerta Machitroll is a Colombia-based Spanish-language campaign launched by Fundación Karisma in 2015 to combat violence against women in the digital environment. The group provides an Alert Generator and self-help strategies to fight online harassment with humor. 


The Crash Override Network’s resource center lists tools, guides and services useful in instances of online abuse, including doxing and non-consensual intimate images, and protection for personal data, passwords and devices. 


Online SOS is a nonprofit organization that focuses on US journalists dealing with any type of online harassment, and provides free support regarding law enforcement, legal remedies, employment-related options, case management, escalation to platforms, expert referral and crisis coaching.


Take Back the Tech is a global collaborative campaign aimed at taking control of technology to end violence against women. They provide assistance to victims of technology-related harassment, digital safety toolkits for devices, and resources for rights, self-care and survivor strategies. They also support and help launch local campaigns.


Resources on Discrimination and Harassment 

Discrimination and harassment in the workplace are common problems plaguing many industries, including journalism. According to a recent report by the Council on Foreign Relations, 18 countries still require women to have their husband’s permission to work, 59 provide no legal protections against sexual harassment in the workplace and 104 restrict the kinds of jobs women can hold. Pay discrimination is global. Below are some resources currently available to help address gender discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplace. 


Women in News has developed a toolkit for employers and employees to deal with (and prevent) sexual harassment in their media organizations. The toolkit includes a practical guide, awareness posters, sample policies, surveys and communication templates. WIN also has various resources to help managers create better working environments for women. The organization works in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.


The International Federation of Journalists is working with the International Labour Organisation on a campaign to stop violence against women journalists. Resources include toolkits, publications and links to relevant policies, including on the gender pay gap. The IFJ provides support and resources to directly address problems — including harassment — and to pressure local governments for meaningful change.


In the United States, the TIME’S UP Legal Defense Fund connects women who experience sexual harassment and retaliation in the workplace with attorneys and media specialists. 


Washington-based Press Forward has a step-by-step guide for female journalists being sexually harassed in the workplace, plus other relevant resources. These are designed with US laws and policies in mind, but can be helpful elsewhere.


In France, Prenons la une is an association of women journalists advocating for fair representation of women in the media and professional equality in newsrooms. The network provides support to women facing discrimination and harassment.


The Brazilian Association of Investigative Journalism (Abraji) conducted research into challenges faced by women in the industry. Based on the findings, Mulheres No Jornalismo Brasileiro lists recommendations for Brazil’s media outlets to address gender-based harassment, discrimination and violence. In 2018, 50 Brazilian female journalists also released a video manifesto against sexual harassment and discrimination using the hashtag #DeixaElaTrabalhar on Facebook and Twitter. The hashtag phrase translates to “Let Her Work.”


Cameroon Media Women launched as a WhatsApp group and a closed Facebook page in 2018 in response to the #MeToo movement. With the #StopSexualHarassment237 hashtag, referring to Cameroon’s country code, women journalists held a Twitter discussion and shared videos discussing the issues facing women in the newsrooms. 


The #MeToo movement has made a mark in Asia. At a GIJN panel at Uncovering Asia 2018, women journalists shared stories and tips on investigating and covering sexual harassment and assault in China and Japan. Also, here’s a series on investigative journalists’ role in covering the #MeToo movement in China from GIJN’s Hong Kong bureau. 


Women journalists in Japan are fighting sexual harassment with the #WithYou movement and recently formed the Women in Media Network Japan. In May, the group published a dossier of anonymous stories about sexual harassment experiences by women journalists in Japan.


The Second Source in the United Kingdom was set up to tackle harassment in the media. The organization aims to promote awareness, inform women of their rights and create change in the industry. 


In France, more than 400 women journalists with Prenons la une signed a petition in November 2018 to march against gender-based violence, with the hashtag #NousToutes. 


A recent study by Women in News, “Glass Ceilings: Women in South African Media Houses” identifies common issues of sexism in media organizations, and provides recommendations to address them. 


Digital Women Leaders offers women journalists free one-on-one coaching for 30 minutes, including on issues such as workplace discrimination, harassment and the pay gap.


Finding Mentors

Mentors come with experience and knowledge that can help you with a wide range of issues, including moving forward with your project, negotiating a fair salary, or navigating an unhealthy work environment or a difficult relationship with a colleague. It can take time to find the right match, but a number of resources are available specifically for women journalists.


Digital Women Leaders offers women journalists free one-on-one coaching for 30 minutes. While most of the coaches listed work in US media, there are a few based around the world. Still, some issues — like workplace discrimination and the pay gap — are universal. 


In the United Kingdom, The Second Source has launched a mentorship scheme “aimed at women who are starting out as professional journalists, who are considering dropping out of the industry or who feel like they need more direction.” It’s intended to provide not only career advice, but also advice for dealing with work-related challenges.


The US-based Journalism & Women Symposium has a year-round mentoring program for members (membership rates here). Mentees are paired with mentors based on needs and location, and establish their own schedule and mode of communication. The program provides support on topics including career coaching, resume writing, job interviews, management and leadership, writing coaching, asking for a raise and more.


The Coalition for Women in Journalism offers mentoring from experienced female journalists in Mexico, Latin America and Asia. 

Chicas Poderosas has chapters in 13 countries and organizes investigative journalism workshops and hackathons; trains women in leadership, digital and new media skills; and facilitates mentoring and fellowships.


London-based Women in Journalism is a professional network of women in the media in the United Kingdom. WIJ has a mentoring program for emerging journalists as well as established journalists who want to reach more senior positions. 

Women in News provides facilitated group mentoring and coaching for women journalists in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia.


Journalistinnenbund has a mentoring program for emerging women journalists in Germany. 


Collection  source: Global Investigative Journalism Network. 

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